Past Programs & Events

2014 - 2013 - 2012 - 2011 - 2010 - 2009

 
Utrecht Peer Exchange
Friday, June 13, 9am at the Neighborhood Preservation Center

The Center invited interns from organizations and agencies around the city to share their work with a group of students in urban geography from Utrecht University. This was our fifth annual exchange. In addition to the Center's intern, interns from Center for an Urban FutureNew York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, New York Preservation Archive Project, and Project for Public Spaces participated. The presentations were followed by a conversation in which the students and interns discussed the field of urbanism and the specifics of New York City urban life. Click here to see photos from the program.

            

Jacques Marchais and The Tibetan Museum
Wednesday, May 21, 6:30pm at the Neighborhood Preservation Center
 
Executive Director, Meg Ventrudo, and Board member, Tenzing Chadotsang, talked about the Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art -- the site, its collection, and its history. Established in 1945, the Museum was founded by the pioneering American woman Jacques Marchais (1887-1948), an important collector and respected expert on Tibetan art. Designed by Marchais, the rustic complex of fieldstone buildings resembles a small Tibetan mountain monastery. These historic buildings represent the first Himalayan style architecture to be built in the United States, and it was the first museum in the world solely devoted to Tibetan art. For the written summary of the evening's lecture, click here.
 

The Rise and Fall of Penn Station Screening Party

Tuesday, February 18, 7:30pm at Professor Thom's Bar and Restaurant

Preservationists, architects, and urbanists of every variety came in the hundreds to see the debut of PBS’s American Experience documentary, The Rise and Fall of Penn Station. After a brief introduction by Tony Wood, Peter Samton said a few words to the crowd about his experience on the picket line outside of the original Penn Station. He spoke of New York City before the preservation movement and the challenges of saving a building – even one as beautiful as Penn Station – in a time when so many were focused on development. After the speeches, the crowd divided itself between the two floors of the bar, and as the clock struck nine o’clock, the lights came down and the documentary began. One wonders if a record had been set for the “World’s Quietest Sports Bar” as images of the old Penn Station flickered across the screen in black and white. Hundreds of people stared fixedly at their TVs as if seeing Penn Station’s glorious construction and infamous destruction for the first time. Once the program had ended and the lights had come up, we parted ways, filled with wisdom, nachos, and the feeling that something very strange and very wonderful had taken place. Old friends who had met serendipitously at the event waved goodbye while new friends exchanged numbers. Pitchers of beer came out as PBS made way for ESPN and Professor Thom’s became a sports bar once again.

The Neighborhood Preservation Center was pleased to co-sponsor this event with the New York Preservation Archive Project, Historic Districts Council, New York Landmarks Conservancy, Pratt Historic Preservation Alumni, Preservation Alumni, and Young City Coalition. Thank you also to the staff of Professor Thom’s Bar and Restaurant. This program was part of NYC Landmarks50 Alliance, the multi-year celebration of New York City’s Landmark Law.