Past Programs & Events

2017 - 2016 - 2015 - 2014 - 2013 - 2012 - 2011 - 2010 - 2009
 

An Evening with APTNE, Featuring Mary Kay Judy

Thursday, June 8th (6 - 8pm)
Neighborhood Preservation Center (232 East 11th Street, NYC 10003)
$10 per person, space was limited, registration was required online

NPC joined the Association for Preservation Technology - Northeast Chapter (APTNE) to offer attendees an evening of socializing, learning about the work of APTNE, and enjoying a presentation by Mary Kay Judy, architectural conservator and preservation consultant. Mary Kay presented Reversible Monuments: Historic Environment as Contemporary Medium, focusing on the phenomenon of contemporary artists using historic architecture, features, infrastructure, and streetscapes as the primary artistic medium of their work, as opposed to solely places of art installation or exhibition. By their nature, Reversible Monuments have a strong conservation and historic preservation component. The works are meant to be temporary, reversible and designed in such a way that no materials, means and methods will leave a lasting impact and all inevitably highlight the historic resource's most enduring and significant features. 

 

Vital Little Plans

Tuesday, May 2 at 6:30pm
Museum of the City of New York (1220 5th Avenue at 103rd Street)
Registration was required online (discount code PLANS2 for $10 tickets was available) 
Reception and book signing followed the program


In honor of the legendary author and activist Jane Jacob's 101st birthday, Alexandra Lange, architecture critic for Curbed, had a conversation with Samuel Zipp, Professor of American Studies and Urban Studies at Brown University, and writer and curator Nathan Storring, about Jacob's powerful evolving legacy. Zipp and Storring are the co-editors of a new, previously-uncollected collection of Jacob's writings and talks called Vital Little Plans: The Short Works of Jane Jacobs
 
This program was part of Off the Page, a literary series that spotlighted authors of the best new non-fiction books written about the five boroughs. This series was presented in conjunction with MCNY's new exhibition New York at Its Core, which told the story of NYC's 400-year history through the lens of four themes: money, density, diversity, and creativity. 

The Neighborhood Preservation Center was pleased to be an honorary co-sponsor of this program. 

 

Mapping NYC's LGBT History

Tuesday, April 25 at 6:30pm
WeWork City Hall (222 Broadway, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10038)
Free, Space was limited and registration required via Eventbrite


Attendees learned about the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project and its newly launched interactive map that documents LGBT place-based history and conveys its impact on American culture. The preservation team discussed the website's many features, including the map's initial 100 LGBT historic sites and ten curated tours, from sites that highlight the city's pre-20th century LGBT history to those related to LGBT activism before Stonewall.

All
 are highly encouraged to suggest NYC sites that matter to them through the project's online suggestions form

This program by the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project was partnered with Neighborhood Preservation Center and sponsored by .
 

Comparative Zoning: Looking to Other Cities

Thursday, April 6th at 6:30pm
Museum of the City of New York (1220 5th Avenue at 103rd Street)
Registration was required  

New York City's groundbreaking 1916 Zoning Resolution inspired major cities around the world to create their own zoning codes. One hundred years later, what can New York learn from the approaches that other cities have taken to zoning? Some municipalities, like Philadelphia, have overhauled their ordinances altogether - should New York consider such a sweeping change? Join to discuss zoning beyond the five boroughs. 
 
This is the fifth and final program in a series in conjunction with MCNY's new exhibition Mastering the Metropolis: New York and Zoning, 1916-2016To view the full series click here. It was presented in collaboration with The Municipal Art Society. The Neighborhood Preservation Center was pleased to be an honorary co-sponsor. 

 

NPC Intern Lecture by Tiffany Piko
Stoops and Why You Should Sit on Them

Tuesday, April 4 at 6pm

Venue: Neighborhood Preservation Center, 232 East 11th Street, NYC 10003
Free, RSVP required. Space limited.


NPC hosted our second intern lecture, this one by Tiffany Piko. Tiffany, a second year student at Parsons the New School for Design majoring in Sustainable Fashion and Design, discussed the valuable impact of stoops and stoop sitting in New York City. Her presentation included the history of stoops in NYC, their presence in pop culture, and how stoops foster community, safety, and creativity.

 

Native New Yorkers Walking Tour

Saturday, April 1 at 11:30am
RSVP was required; books were available for purchase
 
Evan Pritchard, author of Native New Yorkers: The Legacy of the Algonquin People of New York, led this tour that followed the history of New York Streets from west to east, beginning in the Meatpacking District through Greenwich Village and ending at St. Mark's Church In-the-Bowery's graveyard in the East Village. The tour explored how New York's indigenous history influences our modern streetscapes and public spaces. The tour was followed by a casual reception at the Neighborhood Preservation Center. 

This walking tour was presented by The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and co-sponsored by Village Alliance and Neighborhood Preservation Center
 

Skyscrapers: Boon or Blight?

Thursday, March 16 at 6:30pm
The Graduate Center, CUNY, Skylight Room - 9th Floor (365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016)
RSVP was required; books were available for purchase
 
Jason M. Barr, author of Building the Skyline, and Lynn Ellsworth, co-founder of New Yorkers for a Human-Scale City, discussed the influence of skyscrapers along with Alex Marshall, Senior Fellow with the Regional Plan Association, who moderated the discussion. 

This program was co-sponsored by The Gotham Center for New York City History and co-sponsored with Rutgers University - Newark, Preservation League of New York State, Society of Architectural Historians, Friends of the Upper East Side Historic Districts, The Murray Hill Neighborhood Association, Governing magazine, and Neighborhood Preservation Center
 

Cracking the Code: Fostering Public Participation in Zoning

Thursday, March 16 at 6:30pm
Museum of the City of New York1220 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street
Registration was required
 
This was the fourth program in a series in conjunction with MCNY's new exhibition Mastering the Metropolis: New York and Zoning: 1916 - 2016. To view the full series, click here.

This program was presented in collaboration with The Municipal Art Society. The Neighborhood Preservation Center was pleased to be an honorary co-sponsor. 
 
Building History Detectives: Upper East Side
Thursday, March 9 at 6:30pm
Jan Hus Presbyterian Church, 351 East 74th Street 
Registration was required
$10 for Friends members, $20 for non-members

Have you ever wanted to learn more about a building in your neighborhood? When is was built, which architect designed it, and who may have lived there? Attendees became a Building History Detective! Researcher Susan De Vries, active in the preservation field for over 20 years, guided us through ways in which to learn about the buildings that surround us. Her presentation showed the various online tools and resources that can be used to uncover a building's architectural and social history. A handy, neighborhood-specific guide of the sources was distributed at the end of the lecture (copy here). 
 
This program was co-sponsored by Friends of the Upper East Side Historic Districts
 

Zoning to Scale: Considering Neighborhood Character 
Tuesday, February 28 at 6:30pm
Museum of the City of New York1220 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street
Registration was required
 
This was the third program in a series in conjunction with MCNY's new exhibition Mastering the Metropolis: New York and Zoning: 1916 - 2016. To view the full series, click here.

This program was presented in collaboration with The Municipal Art Society. The Neighborhood Preservation Center was pleased to be an honorary co-sponsor. 
 

Preservation Grants Information Session by the Preservation League of New York State
Monday, February 6, from 4:00 - 5:30pm
Venue: Neighborhood Preservation Center, 232 East 11th Street, New York, NY 10003
Free, reservations required online or by calling 518-462-5658 ext. 10
Space limited.

Not-for-profit groups and municipalities were invited to attend a free information session on Preserve New York and Technical Assistance Grants (TAG), the signature grant programs of the New York State Council on the Arts and the Preservation League of New York State.

Erin Tobin, the League's Director of Preservation, explained the requirements of the grants, the process of applying, and discussed some successful previous applicants. For more information on this session, please go here

This program was co-sponsored by NYSCAHistoric Districts Council, and Neighborhood Preservation Center. 

 
Zoning for Public Good
Thursday, January 26th at 6:30pm
Venue: Museum of the City of New York (1220 5th Avenue at 103rd Street)
Registration required online
(use the discount code ZONE for $10 tickets) 
 
This was the second program in a series presented in conjunction with MCNY's new exhibition Mastering the Metropolis: New York and Zoning, 1916-2016. To view the full series click here.
 
This program was presented by MCNY in collaboration with The Municipal Art Society. The Neighborhood Preservation Center was pleased to be an honorary co-sponsor.
 
NPC Intern Lecture by Yunjie Ni 
Public Baths in Manhattan: From the Past to the Future
Wednesday, January 18th from 6:00 - 7:15pm
Venue: Neighborhood Preservation Center, 232 East 11th Street, NYC 10003
Free, RSVP required. Space limited.
 
 
NPC hosted a presentation by Yunjie Ni, an intern at NPC and a graduate of the NYU Masters Program in Historical and Sustainable Architecture. She presented her thesis work on municipal public baths of Manhattan during the Progressive Era (c. 1890s to 1920s). The presentation included an overall history of public baths in New York City, the current status of the historic municipal baths in Manhattan, and their architectural evolution. Yunjie also introduced adaptive reuse precedents from the UK that New York might consider.